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Why Black Families Should Homeschool

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The black community is worse off than most other racial groups in America in a variety of sobering ways – from HIV rates to incarceration rates to poverty rates. This situation is driven directly and indirectly by flawed or deliberately destructive government policies that disproportionately harm Black America. While the two corrupt establishment political parties will argue that their policies help the black community, each causes irreparable harm. For example, the drug war, our foreign policy, minimum wage, public housing and gun control all have a deleterious effect on the liberty, prosperity and security of those in the black community. It’s hard to put a finger on which government policy is the most destructive to the black community, but if I had to choose just one it would be the public education system.

The public education system is no more kind to the black community today than it was under Jim Crow. Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka may have ended the formal segregation of public schools, but today blacks (and Hispanics) disproportionately find themselves in the worst schools. These schools are called dropout factories because no more than 60% of the students who start as freshman make it to their senior year. The 1,700 dropout factories in America constitute only 13% of all the public schools in America, but they produce over 50% of the total dropouts in the nation. 38% of all black students are herded into these dropout factories, which helps explain why the graduation rate for black students is only 51%, and only 47% for black males.

A public high school degree is largely worthless in today’s society as it doesn’t open doors to employment nor does it guarantee a quality education. However, the failure to graduate even 60% of students highlights the pathetic nature of these dropout factories. These schools fail to inspire in children any desire to learn. Like most public schools, the primary goal of the school is to take care of the adults in the system, but these schools tend to be so far removed from any pressure to deliver even a mediocre education that all they produce are kids who drop out or those who graduate without any marketable skills, love of learning, or ability to succeed at an institute of higher education. Children who attend these dropout factories are more likely to find themselves in economic poverty and/or prison than graduating from college.

Compounding an obvious disregard by society for their education, black students in public schools are also subjected to a culture of low expectations which reminds them on a daily basis that they shouldn’t aspire to achieve very much academically, or in life. Whether or not they are made aware of the tremendous achievement gaps between blacks and whites, they tend to recognize that the idealized American vision of being able to achieve whatever they put their minds to does not apply to them. Instead they learn that the academic struggles they may face are merely a symptom of their stupidity and that ANY transgressions are punished harshly in a criminalized classroom. While they are reminded that society has been extremely unkind to the black community, at the same time they are reminded that they must know their place in society, and that demanding equal treatment is disruptive, uncouth and unacceptable. Sending kids to public schools is largely a mistake for anyone. Sending black kids to public schools is a death sentence for many of them (figuratively for most, literally for some).

Charter schools are a better option for black students, but not that much of a better option. While they may give those select few children who can win a lottery a way out of dropout factories, they are still coercive entities which treat children as collective groups, and not as individuals. Private schooling is a much better option for black students, however, stereotypes and biases exist in private schools as well. If a family is socio-economically depressed the only way for them to get into a private school may be through a scholarship or voucher, and as many public school advocates like to point out, throwing a poor kid into a rich school often has its own problems. Homeschooling is by far the best alternative for most black children, just as it is for most children of any other race. But given the institutional racism of traditional schools, black children have much more to gain from homeschooling than most others.

Today an estimated 15% of homeschoolers are minorities, but that percentage should escalate rapidly as parents begin to realize the benefits of homeschooling compared to the tremendous harm of public schooling. Homeschooling allows black children to develop in a manner which emphasizes their worth as individuals and not their lack of worth as members of an unfavoured racial group. When they learn to read they can do so in a way that is relevant to them, and not in a way that is prescribed by bureaucrats and special interest lobbyists. When they learn math they don’t have to deal with a teacher who assumes the least of them. When they study history, black children can learn about all the inspirational men and women who aren’t prioritized in the Euro-centric curriculums of public schools. Instead of being told how stupid they are or how little is expected of them, they can be free to develop their unique talents to the best of their abilities. And it is through developing those unique talents, in conjunction with the real education that homeschooling provides that black children will be able to overcome many of the hurdles that government has placed in their way.

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10 Responses to " Why Black Families Should Homeschool "

  1. Brenda Moore says:

    I have a question. What if the parents are incompetent to teach? My daughter home schooled by Grand daughter against my better judgement. It was a disaster. Today my GD is basically illiterate. I agree with you if parents are educated. I definitely disagree if they are not.

    • Antonio Buehler says:

      As opposed to the teachers who are incompetent to teach? Who is it that you want to decide who is and isn’t competent to teach? The same government that has done such a terrible job administering public education?

  2. Deborah Harris Ivery says:

    How are minority students ‘herded’ to these schools?

  3. [...] From Homeschool News Source- buehlereducation.com [...]

  4. I know most of the examples stated relates to the US nevertheless we are a black family homeschooling our children. We live in the UK and some of the things quoted are true for us aswell. I trained many years ago as a social worker and made the decision then that my children would never enter the school system. I was not married or had any children at the time. 11 years on I have seen anything in the school system that will make me change my mind.

  5. [...] Black people will never get anywhere begging white people to fix problems.  I can’t reiterate this enough, and this is another reason why “Black Lives Matter” sucks and is a waste of your time.  White people do not and cannot understand problems within the black community.  Even the whites that are willing to understand cannot because they are not black.  I mean this with no malice, and I’ve dated white men for years.  I hold no animosity or blame towards white people.  These statements are not meant to be viewed as whitey = racist bad person.  Most people in this world are good, including white people, but black people have lived a different experience than whites.  Don’t waste your time trying to get whites to empathize with blacks.  Homeschooling can improve a multitude a problems within the black community, and I’m not the only who thinks so. [...]

  6. Christina says:

    Wow, I came across your article as I am deciding on whether to enter my 5 year old Black son into public school. You crystallized concerns that led to consideration of home schooling.

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